Search
Close this search box.

When baking, the initial fermentation temperature

Baking fermentation temperature

The initial fermentation of the dough: the dough that has just come out of the vat is placed in a suitable temperature zone to allow the yeast to grow quickly and make the dough more expandable.

Normally, the ambient temperature range for primary fermentation is between 28°C and 35°C. Depending on the type of dough, the fermentation temperature will be appropriately modified.

So how to judge whether the initial fermentation is complete?

Visual experience:

When the volume of the dough is 2-2.5 times the volume of the initial dough, it can be judged that the fermentation is basically completed.
Finger method:

Gently poke your fingers dipped in flour into the dough (about 3-4cm):
If the dough rebounds quickly – insufficient fermentation;
If the dough does not rebound and there is a sunken feeling around it – it is over fermented;
If the dough rebounds about 1/3 – fermentation is complete.

Touch method:

Gently touch the dough with your hands. If it feels like baby skin and the dough is full of gas, press it gently and there is no obstruction at all. It is basically judged that the fermentation is complete.

Every baker has a different way of judging fermentation, but the above three judgment methods are the most basic judgment methods. To accurately judge the fermentation status, a lot of experience is needed.

In addition, the intermediate relaxation temperature , is also important.

After the fermented dough has been divided, rounded and other basic pre-shaping, it is placed in normal temperature, refrigerated and proofed boxes for secondary fermentation. We generally call it “intermediate relaxation” or “intermediate fermentation”.

The middle relaxation time is mostly carried out at room temperature. Depending on the type of dough, the relaxation time is measured by the percentage of yeast content, water content and sugar content in the formula. Conventional dough is basically set at about 20-60 minutes (except for French bread and Danish bread).

There are also cases where the dough is placed in the refrigerator to rest in the middle. This is mostly determined by considering the smoothness of the dough operation time and the store’s sales control at that time; Or because this type of dough is easier to shape after being refrigerated, the temperature of the dough can be lowered to protect the dough from friction during molding to a certain extent.

Normally, what we call normal temperature is 20-25℃, refrigerated temperature is 0-3℃, and the proofing box temperature is 28-35℃.

Final fermentation temperature:

The final fermentation is carried out after the molding is completed. Its purpose is to maximize the activity of the yeast so that it can produce a large amount of gas and maximize the expansion of the dough during baking.

The optimal temperature for final fermentation is 30-40°C, which is slightly higher than the initial fermentation. This is because the temperature with the strongest yeast activity is 37-38°C.

So, how to judge whether the final fermentation is complete?

Visual experience:

Fermentation is complete when the volume of the dough is 2-2.5 times the initial dough volume.

Touch method:

Gently touch the discreet edges of the dough with your hands:
If the dough rebounds quickly – insufficient fermentation;
If the dough does not rebound and there is a sunken feeling around it – it is over fermented;
If the dough rebounds slowly – fermentation is complete.

Shaking method:

Gently shake the baking pan with your hands. The risen dough will shake like “fat meat” and look particularly soft. (For toast bread, it depends on the size of the dough and the fermentation height. Usually the toast will be 9 minutes full.)

Tips:

Temperature of various types of dough out of the cylinder:
The temperature of soft bread and sweet bread is about 26-28℃;
The temperature of French bread is about 20-24℃;
The temperature of Danish bread is about 22-26℃.

What is overfermentation?

Overfermentation refers to a state caused by bread fermentation taking too long or the dough temperature being too high.

Over-fermented bread dough will expand too much, causing bubbles to float on the surface and become uneven; in addition, the gluten will relax and lose elasticity. If you press it with your fingers, the dough will fall off and shrink.

In fact, the temperature of the dough at each stage is closely related to the state of fermentation. For perfect bread, from the beginning of weighing to the final baking, there are many details in each step, which are all particularly important.

As bakers, only by summarizing more, learning more, and accumulating sufficient practical experience can we become more and more skillful in making.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Facebook

Ask For A Quick Quote

We will contact you within 1 working day, please pay attention to the email with the suffix “@justlonghealth.com”